Sunday, February 1, 2015

HOTTs and Poland


So. . . not HOTTs in Poland. . . The Poland part comes later on. Bruce and I played three games of HOTTs last weekend. I played with my Undead, Bruce trotted out a different army in each of the three games. I played with 8 Hordes, a Behemoth, 2 Flyers, A Hero (vampires) and a Magician General. I defended in the first game.


The Sea Kings brought Riders, Airboats, Flyers and A Hero General. We both lined up fairly conservatively, holding our Flyers in reserve. The Riders waded into the Hordes while the Airboats threatened the Undead left flank.


The left flank turned into a scrum. An Airboat went down to a Hero then the Sea King Hero General picked a fight with the Vampires and lost. . . so Game One goes to the Undead.


For Game Two Bruce defended with the Macedonians: Shooters, Spears, Riders, Behemoth, Warbands and Hero General, of course.


And then, suddenly, as the armies are closing, the Macedonian Hero General is ensorceled. Game Over! The "hole" in the Macedonian line is where the Hero was. . .


Since it was over so quickly, we decided to play the game out. With the General gone, all of the Macedonian moves cost an extra pip. The Hordes held on long enough to allow the Undead Behemoth to kill its Macedonian counterpart, then finish off the Warbands for the "official" win.




Barbarians turned up for Game Three. Magician General, two Heroes and Warbands. A scary number of Heroes.



I lost my Hero to one of the Barbarian Heroes. Though I was able to ensorcle one of the Barbarian Heroes and play for time, the other Hero shrugged off 3 magical attacks as it chased down the Undead Magician General for the win. The Warbands never even got into contact!






So what about Poland? I just finished reading Poland by James A. Michener. Not a new book; my mother-in-law recommended it - strongly - citing my Polish ancestry. Amazon describes it thus:

In this sweeping novel, James A. Michener chronicles eight tumultuous centuries as three Polish families live out their destinies. The Counts Lubonski, the petty nobles Bukowksi, and the peasants Buk are at some times fiercely united, at others tragically divided. With an inspiring tradition of resistance to brutal invaders, from the barbarians to the Nazis, and a heritage of pride that burns through eras of romantic passion and courageous solidarity, their common story reaches a breathtaking culmination in the historic showdown between the ruthless Communists and rebellious farmers of the modern age. Like the heroic land that is its subject, Poland teems with vivid events, unforgettable characters, and the unfolding drama of an entire nation.


Praise for Poland
 
“Engrossing . . . a page-turner in the grand Michener tradition.”—The Washington Post
 
“A Michener epic is far more than a bedtime reader, it’s an experience. Poland is a monumental effort, a magnificent guide to a better understanding of the country’s tribulations.”—Chicago Tribune
 
“Stunning . . . an unmatched overview of Polish history . . . The families themselves come very much alive, and through them, Poland itself.”—USA Today
 
“A titanic documentary novel.”—The Wall Street Journal


I learned a lot. For instance, I didn't know anything about the Russian attacks of 1920. Mr. Michener does a great job of creating characters you can really care about. . . and so many of them meet tragic ends. Quite a read - I recommend it, too.

See ya!





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